Monthly Archives: November 2016

How to make your copy resonate (and become a whole lot easier to write)

Confession: I’m still running off my “high” from the teleclass I hosted last week.

An awesome organization called the Global Institute of Travel Entrepreneurs (GIFTE) invited me on the call. I packed a lot of info into an hour — and I only said “um” a few times! Phew.

GIFTE teaches travel professionals cutting-edge marketing and business strategies so they can get seen — and get more clients. I actually got my start in marketing at GIFTE years ago, so it was incredible to give back to the community that gave me so much (and if you were on the line last week — hello again!).

One of the big things I covered during the teleclass was the idea that you need to get specific in your copywriting. Don’t revert to writing in generalities out of fear of excluding some of your web visitors. In short, generalities = boring copy, but specifics = vivid, captivating, high-converting copy. Hallelujah!

The point really resonated with a lot of the listeners on the line.

But it also begs the question: is there such a thing as getting too specific?

Like, if you wrote your copy to a really, really specific audience — like a middle-aged man named Bob, who wears Brooks Brothers’ blazers and collects vintage cars — that would definitely be too specific, right?

Wrong. In fact, that’s exactly how specific you should be getting.

In marketing, we talk a lot about ideal prospects and ideal clients — but when you write your website copy (or any copy, really), try writing with just a single ideal client in mind. Just write to one person, and give him or her a name and back story (beyond simple demographics like income and age), and write what you think will really resonate with this one person.

Now that may feel like you’re getting wayyyy too specific … but writing this way will make your copy feel more conversational — not stiff or corporate, like it would if you were trying to write to a segment of people.

Writing to one person makes your writing sound personal. That sounds obvious, but it’s really, really powerful.

Plus, it’s a mindset shift that should help calm your writing nerves. When you’re just writing to Bob, or Patricia, or Chantelle, it’s not a scary process. You’re not thinking about how the whole world will be able to read what you’re writing.

It’s just a chat with a friendly acquaintance that you really want to help out.

Not so scary now, is it?

So get writing. Bob, or Patricia, or Chantelle (or whomever!) can’t wait to hear from you.